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S1:E9 – “Miri”
So many of these episodes revolve around women. I wish I had a more eloquent and well thought out thesis statement to go along with that observation. It’s just a theme I’m picking up on. F
Published on May 23, 2013 | Filed under Project: Star Trek

So many of these episodes revolve around women.

I wish I had a more eloquent and well thought out thesis statement to go along with that observation. It’s just a theme I’m picking up on. From “Mudd’s Women,” to “The Man Trap,” and most recently “What Are Little Girls Made Of?,” it’s obvious that females often drive these stories. “Miri” is no different.

Miri

The Enterprise gets a distress call (I’m also seeing a trend here…) from a–wait for it–nother earth! No, not the one with Brit Marling. Another nother earth. This one is, ironically enough, stuck in the ’60s and filled with kids who have their own weird language. Or rather, kids that say three words weird. There’s this disease on the child-filled planet though. When they hit puberty, they age real fast and die. Oh, and they’re 300 years old. What?

There is so much science in this episode. Lots of beakers and then, after the crew contracts the super-fast aging/death disease, there’s angry science. Tensions run high, and that makes for some truly awe-inspiring Kirk action. Standout moments include, but are certainly not limited to, Kirk’s speech to the murderous 300 year old kids, his reaction to being hit on the head, and his flirting with a young girl.

Miri

Yea, he sweet talks little Miri like a boss. Sure, Kim Darby was nearly 20, but she was playing it young, and it was sufficiently creepy. Even Yeoman Rand (so glad to have her back) was sort of like “wtf?” That is until Spock reminded her Miri was 300 years old. Still awfully childlike in both demeanor and mental development, but it’s cool guys, she’s 300.

Aside form classic Kirk antics and the seduction of young girls, “Miri” also features a young Michael J. Pollard. And really, this episode is all about the kids. Oh, and Yeoman Rand’s sort of love confession to the Captain. But mostly the kids.

It’s worth nothing that “Miri” was written by Dark of the Sun scribe Adrian Spies. You can hear myself and 3 other awesome people talk about the Rod Taylor/Jim Brown vehicle on The Feminine Critique podcast.

Author:
Christine enjoys obsessing over Paracinema magazine. She also loves well written hour long TV dramas. Her free time is spent with her many boyfriends: Brian De Palma, Edgar Wright & Alfred Hitchcock.

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